Items for Sale - Miscellaneous - Section Two

11780a

Post Office Accounting Form for letters from Columbus, Mississippi to Canton, Mississippi dated Aug 21, 1864 with printed name of J. Isaacs, P.M. showing amount paid by stamps and money on that date, usual crease and spindle holes. $45.

$ 45

11942

Georgia manuscript cancel on cover to Lt. James D. Anthony, Co. L, 1st Regt. Ga Regulars, Chattahoochee Arsenal Florida. Stamp missing at upper right. The arsenal part of the address was penned out and replaced with “Per W A McDonald, Courier, Savannah, Ga”  all in manuscript. Small contemporary clipped out embossed circular SEAL OF THE INTERIOR COURT accompanies, undoubtedly from original enclosure no longer present. Very unusual piece with significant amount of additional information included. The subject of one of my "Confederate Post" columns in the American Stamp Dealer and Collector. $400.
 

Chattahoochee Arsenal was the scene of the first military action of the Civil War in Florida. On January 6, 1861, acting under orders from Governor Madison Perry, the Quincy Young Guards seized the facility from its caretaker force without firing a shot. The arsenal then served the state and the Confederacy for the next four years.

James Rembert Anthony enlisted as a private in Company A, 9th Regiment, Georgia Infantry Jun. 11, 1861.  He was elected 2nd Lieutenant Company I, 1st Regiment, Georgia Regulars, Sept. 5, 1861; 1st Lieutenant Oct. 3, 1862. Wounded Petersburg, Virginia 1864. Elected Captain Company C, Mar. 28, 1865. Born in Washington, GA September 2, 1841. Found on the roster of Company L, 1st Regiment Georgia Regulars, Fulton County "Atlanta Greys" or "Fulton Greys". This regiment was stationed at Apalachicola Arsenal, Florida from April 9, 1863 to November 10, 1863.

$ 400

12294

Texas Brigade, hand-carried by military courier, cover linking two Texan Confederates. Addressed simply too “Col. Henry N. Potter.” Endorsed across the top “From C.B. Gardiner, Clerk in Adjt. Genls. Office, Texas Brigade.” Potter served in 6th Texas Infantry. Born in Conn., he moved to Galveston County in 1838, serving in the Republic of Texas Congress. A member of the Cavalry of the West, Gardiner had his horse shot out from under him in a fight around Las Rucias Ranch: “The brief but fierce battle ended in a complete rout of the Federals. The Union cavalry fought fiercely...believing that since they were Texas Unionists, the Confederates might execute them as traitors...”--The Yankee Invasion of Texas, Townsend, p. 102. Gardiner also served in the 15th Texas Light Artillery, Trans-Mississippi Dept. Extra historical military information accompanies.  $240.

$ 240

12419

Civil War Correspondence. Four letters written by Louisa Maury from New Orleans in August and October 1862 to her Aunt Ann in New York City, content briefly mentions the Battle of Shiloh, writer's husband who is a Confederate prisoner of war, some other interesting reading; these were found in the accompanying overall gray Quartermaster General's Department, State of New York "Official Business" envelope, addressed but no evidence it went through the mails. The letters were most likely carried by "Flag of Truce" and one is noted as “Politeness of Mr. Messina”. Some content reads, "...my sister started for Galveston the week after the Federals entered New Orleans. Her husband is in the army but where I do not know. His only brother died here just before my sister left from the affects of sickness contracted while in camp at Corinth. He was in the battle of Shiloh and escaped death and then came home to die of disease which to a soldier seems worse than instant death upon the battlefield." And "The news sent me of my brother was the greatest pleasure I have had in a long time. I had heard so many different stories of him that I was very uneasy about him. First he was dead then a prisoner then badly wounded and in Richmond." And, "II suppose this note will not reach you for a month..." Very Fine and interesting correspondence sent across enemy lines during the war.   $600. Click on linked pages to see letters.

Letter p. 001
Letter p. 002
Letter p. 003
Letter p. 004
Letter p. 005
Letter p. 006
Letter p. 007
Letter p. 008
Letter p. 009
Letter p. 010

$ 600

13008

New Orleans to Le Havre, France, July 1861, blue folded letter datelined "New Orleans 8 July, 1861", France 20¢ Blue, tied by diamond grid cancel, blue "FORWARDED BY J. BARBE, HAVRE" octagonal handstamp, Paris datestamp, Le Havre receiving 7 Aug ’61 backstamp; letter  to H. F. McKenna Esq, Care J. Barbe Esq, Havre France from W. Bogart which relates to business and states "we are in hourly expectation of hearing of hard fighting in Virginia", file fold and minor edge nick, Very Fine, probably sent inside an across-the-lines express cover to the North and then sent outside the mails to Le Havre. Docketing on verso “Chas Lagory Hotel Byron, Rue Laffatte, Paris 21 Aug 61. Extremely clean and showy. $450.

$ 450

13009

AM. LETTER EXPRESS CO. / LOUISVILLE KY. / 307 GREEN, CSA Catalog ALS-01c, blue circular datestamp on back of 3¢ red Star Die entire #U26 to Joseph Wenger Sen., Edom, Rockingham County Virginia;  blue NASHVILLE / Ten. // AUG / 24 / 1861 cds with matching "PAID" straightline and "10" handstamps, manuscript "Due 5" with large pencil "X" below it; another pencil mark cancels the indicia, edge wear and soiling, Very late southbound through-the-lines cover carried by private express, mailed only four days before the final American Letter Express trip left Nashville and had its letter bags seized in Louisville by a U.S. marshal, the Special Routes census records only one later example. This cover not recorded and is listed as “unsupported” in the CSA Catalog, thus this is the listing copy and only one recorded. ] 1984 PF certificate 1300546, CCV $4,000.  $2,000.

$ 2,000

13429

Confederate Postal Receipt from Canton, Mississippi for “Letters from Iuka, Miss to Canton” dated December 1864 and signed by postmaster Wm. L. Derwoody. $25.

$ 25

13431

Confederate Postal Receipt from Canton, Mississippi for receipts from Columbia Va Dec 24, 1864 and signed by the postmaster, E. Robinson. $25.

$ 25

13635

Letter from Union soldier, signed F(rancis?) Patton, Oakland, Spencer County [Indiana], Jan. 5, 1862, 4 pp., 4 ½”  x 7 ¾” to his son G. L. Patton. “...I have been out in Warrie and Dubois...and at Camp Shanklin...Calhoon on Green River...45 [miles[ from Bo[w]lingreen. There are about 7,000 men in camp here, 1,100 of them cavalry & fine horses they have to[o]...it is Jackson’s Cavalry...They had a skirmish...It is reported Jackson killed 60 of the secesh and he lost 8 killed & 25 missing supposed to be taken prisoners. It is said they burnt the Town. Also that a boy 14 years old was ordered to surrender himself prisoner by a Secesh Captain. Boy shot him with his revolver and mounted the Captain’s horse & rode him safe into Camp. I had determined to stay here and see the Bolingreen Battle go off but Maj. Shanklin told me he had reported his Regt. not fit for duty for 2 months...If you was called to do your duty as a soldier, stand to your Post at all hazards, obey your superior officers with alacrity and show mercy to them that mercy is due...That single instance of the deserter that Ben... saw shot is enough to warn every man of his fate and duty...You should be careful about the small pox...You had better get vaccinated at once....”  Includes names soldiers who have died. With typewritten transcript. Minor tears at folds repaired with document film.  $475.

$ 475

13637

The Case of the Confederate Prize Ship. Intriguing manuscript entitled, “Capture of Ship Marathon, May 1861,” apparently a draft legal statement of this noted episode - likely prepared during and for the Alabama Claims, circa 1885. In contemporary hand of ship’s trustee, the brother of the late Henry S. Tyler, one of the vessel’s owners, referring to having read testimony of the ship’s captain. On lined pale blue lettersheet, 8” x 10 ½”, 3 ½  pp. Some pen and pencil underlining; curious replacement of words “Confederate States” with “captors.” It took over twenty years, but in 1885 the Marathon’s original owners sued, in the Court known as Alabama Claims, for losses when their ship was captured on the high seas by the Confederate cruiser Music, and towed to New Orleans. “On arrival at New Orleans, Capt. Chauncey Tyler (one of the owners) made a simulate(d) sale or transfer to Anna Heaton, a British subject, for the purpose if possible of releasing his Ship from the Confederate States [crossed out and replaced with ‘Captors’]. The sale was not a bona fide transaction...done merely to prevent the condemnation as a prize of War, and for the purpose of misleading the Confederate Authorities, and obtain the escape of the vessel, and was not intended to divest the title of the real owners...and as the Ship’s Trustee(?) I continued to pay her bills & expenses, the same as before the pretended transfer...After the arrival of the Vessel at Liverpool in Aug. 1861 until she was sold in New York in Mar. 1862, she was a loss to the owners...and the complicated condition of the title was very embarrassing...” Listing owners of the ship, in sixteenth interests, including Chauncey, Horace, Christopher, and Selden Tyler, Richard Pratt, Wm. Palmer, Gideon Parker, Hezekiah Scovil, et al. In describing the members of his Tyler family, the writer continues, “There is no real difference...so any money received from Ship Marathon would go to the same parties...” Moderate foxing, handling, and edge wear, -a  fascinating artifact of this saga, just weeks after Fort Sumter. The legal aspects of the case were unique and fascinating. From the beginning, the story became inordinately complicated. The litigants not only were exhaustive in their pursuit, but must have been exhausted themselves; in the end, the Court awarded no damages. Ironically, the success of the Alabama Claims Commission was due in large part to another Tyler - the former Confederate Treasury Secretary - whose postwar assistance was rewarded with a judgeship. Alabama Claims manuscript material has largely vanished from the market. With modern research. $450.

$ 450

13712b

“John H. Reagan / Texas” autograph on small card. John Henninger Reagan (1818-1905), a US Representative from Texas 1857-1861, had opposed secession, but resigned from the US Congress when his state left the Union. He became Postmaster General of the Confederacy, making his Department the first fully functional, and most successful, of any. $270.

$ 270

14039

Stage Coach Coupon issued by Quartermaster's Department, C.S.A. from Albany, Georgia. Partly printed coupon completed in manuscript, dated Mch 11 with 1864 printed and ms. corrected to 1865, 2" x 3.25". "No. 4868" for one seat on a stage coach from Albany to Quincy. Stamped boldly on the back: "H.F. Hoyt, Tr. Agt" in fancy frame. A lovely example, slightly faded writing. $200.

$ 200

14455a

SOLDIER’S LETTER / PUZZLE PURSE headed Wartrace, Tenn., April 27th, 1863: intricately folded long 2-page letter (puzzle purse) in dark pencil from W. S. Stidham (William S.) Wartrace was on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad. Salutation is “Dear Cousin It” (This way before Cousin Itt of the Addams Family – of course I could be reading it wrong too, but sure looks like that.) Letter says, in part, “We are camped at this place but for how long we will stay here I can’t say, knight before last we was ordered to cook two days rations and be ready to lead here at daylight the next morning and the order also said that we were to leave our knapsacks here. We were only to take one blanket with us. I supposed that we would be in a fight in a very short time, but the orders was countermanded before daylight…some of prettiest quales here that I ever saw…now sposen I go to see a gal, and sposen I call her my duck and sposen she calls me her old goose, what’s going to be done about that, that is the question and sposen we get into a battle and it turns out to be a fight a sposen, sposen and sposen we get to shooting and sposen you here something drop and sposen you look round and some body has got hurt who is good to pay that, that am de question who is going to pay for it and sposen old Braggs says I have to leave here and sposen I have to leave my lasses again who is to blame for that…” and on and on “sposen” until he ends with “enough of my nonsense.” When I first saw this letter, I immediately thought of my old collection of antique valentines. Puzzle Purses are origami-like foldings of square pieces of paper into envelope-like packets. Sure enough, at the end of the letter our boy says “the following lovers puzzle, see if you can read it.” (puzzle follows in the second page of the scan – I leave you to figure it out). Nifty letter (spelling and language left as is, some punctuation added for ease of reading). Stidham enlisted as a private in Co. B, 48th GA Infantry, Army Northern Virginia. He was wounded at Spotsylvania and wounded again at Hatcher’s Run. One source indicated that he was an Ensign but I have not tried to chase that down. Detailed military and personal records included. $250.

$ 250

14508

Jefferson Davis / Alexander Stephens electoral ticket - Commonwealth of Virginia: 3” x 5” paper ballot with single tiny spindle hole at center indicating it was actually used and reverse ink signature of voter “John Kresham”. Top six lines read “For President / Jefferson Davis, / of Mississippi // For Vice President / Alexander H. Stephens, / of Georgia.” Below are names and counties of electors for State at Large. $400.

$ 400

14533

Jefferson Davis / Alexander Stephens electoral ticket - Commonwealth of Virginia: 3” x 5”” paper ballot with single tiny spindle hole at center indicating it was actually used and reverse ink signature of the voter. Top six lines read “For President / Jefferson Davis, / of Mississippi // For Vice President / Alexander H. Stephens, / of Georgia.” Below are names and counties of electors for State at Large. $300.

$ 300

14523

UNDERGROUND LETTER headed Nov 15th 1862 to Will, articulate 4-page letter North to South to Confederate Soldier William H. Gordon Jr. (Georgetown, DC to Richmond, Virginia) from both mother & sister – 2 pages from each. Docketing on last page reads “Georgetown D.C. Nov. 2 & 3/62, Mother & Sister, Underground” says, in part, “Have promised to write you by every opportunity, I again commence a letter as a friend offered to dispatch a document.” Mentions sending carte-visites to Mr. Ould… “Will any reach their places of destination is the question.” Gordon was a prisoner at Old Capitol just prior to this. $100. 


William H. Gordon, Jr. The Wheatley and Gordon families lived at 3041-3045 N Street, Georgetown, D.C. during the Civil War. Although both families had southern sympathies, William H. Gordon, Sr. remained in his U.S. government job. He was commended upon retirement as being "one of the oldest and most valuable of government employees." Much more information on linked page.

Page 1
Page 2

Page 3
Page 4

 

$ 100

14525

FLAG OF TRUCE LETTER (4 pages) headed March 12, 1863, North to South letter to Confederate Soldier William H Gordon, Jr (Georgetown, DC to Richmond, Virginia) from his sister, Josie concerning her repeated attempts to communicate by any way possible, his probable transfer to more active service, etc. This letter reads in part, "I will again make an effort to send you one (letter) through that source (flag of truce)…I despatched (sic) an open letter to you in Feb. & but a short time since flattered myself a second was on its way to you when alas! It was returned (to) me with the discouraging message that it could not be sent…The ladies who went down in Jan took messages for you & Mother’s photograph…Your letters of Jan 13th had been received, but not the one by flag of truce earlier in the month."  $120.

William H. Gordon, Jr. The Wheatley and Gordon families lived at 3041-3045 N Street, Georgetown, D.C. during the Civil War. Although both families had southern sympathies, William H. Gordon, Sr. remained in his U.S. government job. He was commended upon retirement as being "one of the oldest and most valuable of government employees." Much more information on linked page.

Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4

$ 120

14642

McClellan / Pendleton 1864 U.S. Democratic presidential ballot from Morgan County, with list of Electors. Usual creasing and spindle holes at center where used to tally votes. Rare ballot from the ticket that lost to Lincoln and Johnson. McClellan, age 37 at the time of the convention and Pendleton, age 39, are the youngest presidential ticket ever nominated. $250

$ 250

15120

Union Civil War Letter headed “Camp at Brooks Station, Va Nov 25th 1862” from Corporal Robert H. Ray, Company C, 11th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Corps to his brother William Ray in Jacksonville, Oregon. He asks that correspondence be directed to him in Washington, DC. Three pages with great content that describes him joining McClellan’s Army at the Peninsula and “two weeks later got into a fight and a hard one it was, there were 4 killed and 22 wounded in our company. Newton Redic was killed. The remainder was taken prisoners. We were taken to Richmond and kept there till from the 27th of June till the 5th day of August. We got pretty hard usage…we spent some hungry times. We were exchanged and put right into the service again. We were brought back here and joined Popes Army. Then came the battle of Bull Run where we suffered heavy again. Lieutenant Kuhn was killed there also your old friend Samuel Christley. Then when the Rebels went into MD, McClellan got command and we whipped the Rebs at South Mountain and Antietam…” and much more. US 3¢ pink entire to William Ray accompanies. It is tied Baldwin PA in Dec. (a suburb of Pittsburgh where they were from). Brooks Station, VA, was near Fredericksburg, VA, and the Potomac River. It is likely that this was carried home to a relative who forwarded it for Robert. $350.

Letter, pgs 2-3
Union cover

$ 350

15541

SOUTHERN EXPRESS COMPANY / AUGUSTA GA // MAY 31 blue double circle on cover addressed to W. Johnston Esq, Station No 6 CRR Screven Co, Geo with docketing at top “320$ from P A Scranton” on TURNED COVER addressed but not postally used to “Mrs. P A Scranton Burlington, Connecticut.” Five red wax seals on verso sealing back flaps. The absence of a mail registration system in the Confederacy made it necessary to use express companies to transmit valuable letters. Postage was required on all express letters, but the Act of April 1862 changed the law from allowing adhesive stamps to requiring stamped envelopes, which of course the government did not provide. The calculated effect of this regulation was a ban on private express mail, but surviving covers show that the companies continued to carry letters. It was illegal for express companies to carry mail starting June 1, 1862. Although “May 1862” is penciled on the verso, it is more likely immediately postwar and sold as such although it could potentially be a “last day” cover. The same markings were used during the war and immediately postwar. $550. Much more information on linked page.

$ 550

15536

LETTER (no cover) 4-pages headed “McKinley [Tennessee] Dec 29th/1861” addressed to “Dear Cousin” from Sue saying that “Dr. Anderson has returned home and was highly pleased with Arkansas. If the blockade is opened between now and next fall, I expect we will move there and would like to have you and your better half to move also nearby us where we can see each other often…William sais (sic) tell cousin Hoskins that Arkansas is a fine country for other things as well as cotton, corn, wheat & potatoes grow there to a perfection…It seems that hog meat is about as cheap there as in Tennessee…There are no Union men in that neighborhood and I don’t think in the county, all states right secessionists, no Brownlowes or bridg[e] burners; all seem to be united hand and heart in the great move for southern liberty and independence. William Joins. $200.

Letter - page 2 - click to view    
Letter - page 3 - click to view 

Letter - page 4 - click to view

$ 200

15785

MILITARY COURIER from ARKANSAS to TEXAS: CSA 11, 10¢ blue (gum stains) tied neat bold CAMDEN / Ark // OCT / 1 [1863] cds on homemade cover to Mrs. Mattie Yell, Waco, McClennan Co, Texas, from her husband, Col. Fountain Pitts Yell who served the 26th Arkansas Infantry. Cover with sealed tear at upper left and staining along right side. “Courier” noted at lower left. Military mail was taken across the river between Arkansas and Texas by express services such as those run by Bernos and Barksdale of the 2nd Arkansas who advertised their services in the Houston Telegraph. Such express covers incurred a charge of $1.00 and catalog $3,500 in the CSA Catalog and are very rare. Others were sent by military courier which presumably achieved the same thing without the additional outlay for postage. Ex Clippert. $1,100.

Fountain Pitts Yell (1834-1864) served in Co. A, 2th Arkansas Infantry and later in reorganized Company S, 26th Arkansas Infantry.  Much more information on the linked page.

$ 1,100

15786

MILITARY COURIER or COURTESY from TEXAS to ARKANSAS: CSA 12c, 10¢ bluish green (4 large to just clear margins) tied WASHINGTON / Ark. // FEB / 21 [1864] on cover (slightly reduced at right) to Col. J. R. Pettigrew, Fagan’s Brigade, Camden, Arkansas, with ORIGINAL 2-PAGE LETTER headed “Waco Texas Feb 14 / 64” to “Dear Jim” from “Yell” - Fountain Pitts Yell. He begins by saying “I drop you a line by Israel Pettigrew” who acted either as an official or unofficial courier from Texas to Arkansas where he dropped the letter into the Confederate mail system. Military mail was taken across the river between Arkansas and Texas by express services such as those run by Bernos and Barksdale of the 2nd Arkansas who advertised their services in the Houston Telegraph. Such express covers incurred a charge of $1.00 and catalog $3,500 in the CSA Catalog and are very rare. Others were sent by military courier which presumably achieved the same thing without the additional outlay for postage. In his letter, Yell speaks about wanting to keep up on news of his wife, Mattie, in Arkansas. He also says, in part, “There is some excitement here about the Feds landing a force on the Coast – expect a fight every day…saw that Marmaduke had taken Pine Bluff and torn up the Rail Road from Little Rock to White River. Am glad to hear that you are doing something in Arkansas for if they are not driven out of Arkansas we will be starved out in one more year for Texas with her droughts can’t support the Trans Mississippi District…If we succeed and I live through this war (he was killed in action two months later) will leave Texas.” Fabulous use and letter with great provenance of Ex Lemley and Gallagher. Ex Clippert. $1,250.

Fountain Pitts Yell (1834-1864) enlisted 1 July 1862 as Captain in Co. A, 2th Arkansas Infantry and later in reorganized Company S, 26th Arkansas Infantry (also known as Morgan’s Battalion and the 3rd Trans-Mississippi Rifle Regiment).
Israel Delany Pettigrew (1827-1917) served as a private in Company D, 1st Battalion Arkansas Cavalry.
James R. Pettigrew enlisted 1 August 1862 as Captain in Co. K, Arkansas 34th Infantry, Trans-Mississippi Department (also called the 2nd Arkansas). He was subsequently promoted to Major and then Lt. Colonel.

Much more information on the linked page.

Listed in both Miscellaneous-2 and CSA 12

$ 1,250

15787

PER COURIER VIA LEWISVILLE, ARKANSAS: CSA 12c, 10¢ bluish green, uncanceled on cover to “Mrs. Sadie Armstrong, Washington, Arkansas” and in the same hand, “Care of Col. Jno. R. Eakin” (editor of the Washington Telegraph) with important directive at upper right in different hand, “Per Courier via Lewisville.” In the Washington Telegraph, February 5, 1862, “Rev. B. B. Black, Chaplain of the South Arkansas (McNair's) Regiment, will leave for camp next Monday. Persons desiring to send letters or very small packages to their friends in camp, will please leave them at the drug store of Moore & Smith before 9 o'clock Monday morning.” If the stamp is original to the cover, this would mean it could not have been Black who carried it, but it is likely that Eakin looked for others to transport mail. Regrettably, the upper right corner of both stamp and cover have been poorly restored / stained. Nonetheless, a rare use. Ex Gallagher and Clippert. $350.

Col. John R. Eakin (1822-1885) was editor of the Washington Telegraph, the foremost organ of Confederate propaganda in the southern part of Arkansas and the only editor in the state to continue publication throughout the war and into the Reconstruction period. Much more information on the linked page.

Bartimeus “Bartee” or “Bartie” B. Black enlisted as a Chaplain and was commissioned into Field and Staff of the 4th Arkansas Infantry. Much more information on the linked page.

Listed in both Miscellaneous-2 and CSA 12

$ 350

15829

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COURIER OR COURTESY: PINE BLUFF / ARK // JUN / 20 / 1862 double circle datestamp with matching 5 DUE (CSA Catalog Type D) on cover to Mrs. F. K. Keesee, Hillsboro, Arks, with “Politeness of Mr. Green” at lower left in ink and same handwriting as address; pencil notation at top “From C. Ashbrook, Co. G. Harpers’ Reg. Ark. Mt. Rifles, Churchills’ Brigade, Van Dorns’ Division.” Tiny bit of upper left corner replaced and top back flap missing, CARRIED EAST TO WEST ACROSS THE MISSISSIPPI WHERE IT ENTERED THE MAIL SYSTEM IN ARKANSAS. Ex Clippert. $1,750.

Calvin Ashbrook - Company G, 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles (Napoleon Rifles) was discharged from Camp Ingraham, Miss, and given travel allowance (300 miles) back to Napoleon, Arkansas. Copy of discharge papers included. Much more information on the linked page.

Milton S. Keesee (1837- 1883) and Fannie (Coburn) Keesee (1840-1880) were in the same household in Hillsboro in the 1860 U.S. census. Milton S. Keesee served as a private and later as a lieutenant with the 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles. Much more information on the linked page.

Listed in Miscellaneous-2 and Arkansas Stampless

$ 1,750

15836

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COURTESY USE: US #26 3¢ star-die entire to Mrs. Rowland B. Smith, Camden, Arkansas, with manuscript directive at lower left “Fav[or] I (?) Mack.” Sent from an officer in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry home to his wife, Rose. Uncanceled adversity use of demonetized U.S. envelope, which never passed through the mails, unknown date. Like all the other Arkansas regiments raised in the first wave of recruiting in 1861, the regiments were taken into Confederate armies east of the Mississippi River. Water staining which is likely a result of that hazardous journey across the river. Ex Matz and Clippert. $350.

Rowland B. Smith: Second Lieutenant enlisted in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry (aka Carroll's Regiment), 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the West. He quickly advanced to the rank of Major and became the commissary supply officer on staff of Cabell's Brigade. He later served on General Dockery's staff and was severely wounded at the Battle of Marks' Mill.” Much more information on the linked page.

$ 350

15837

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COURIER USE: US #27 3¢ star-die entire to Mrs. Rowland B. Smith, Care Maj. E. N. Woodland, Camden, Arkansas, with manuscript directive at lower left “Courier.” Sent from an officer in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry home to his wife, Rose. Uncanceled adversity use of demonetized U.S. envelope, which never passed through the mails, unknown date. Like all the other Arkansas regiments raised in the first wave of recruiting in 1861, the regiments were taken into Confederate armies east of the Mississippi River. Clipped corner upper right and water staining which is likely a result of that hazardous journey across the river. Ex Matz and Clippert. $300.

Rowland B. Smith: Second Lieutenant enlisted in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry (aka Carroll's Regiment), 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the West. He quickly advanced to the rank of Major and became the commissary supply officer on staff of Cabell's Brigade. He later served on General Dockery's staff and was severely wounded at the Battle of Marks' Mill.” Much more information on the linked page.

$ 300

15838

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COURIER or COURTESY USE: US #27 3¢ star-die entire to Mrs. Rowland B. Smith, Camden, Arkansas, in faint pencil with manuscript directive at lower left “Fav[or] Courier.” Sent from an officer in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry home to his wife, Rose. Uncanceled adversity use of demonetized U.S. envelope, which never passed through the mails, unknown date. Like all the other Arkansas regiments raised in the first wave of recruiting in 1861, the regiments were taken into Confederate armies east of the Mississippi River. Water staining which is likely a result of that hazardous journey across the river. Ex Matz and Clippert. $300.

Rowland B. Smith: Second Lieutenant enlisted in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry (aka Carroll's Regiment), 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the West. He quickly advanced to the rank of Major and became the commissary supply officer on staff of Cabell's Brigade. He later served on General Dockery's staff and was severely wounded at the Battle of Marks' Mill.” Much more information on the linked page.

$ 300

15839

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COURIER or COURTESY USE: US #27 3¢ star-die entire to Mrs. Rowland B. Smith, Camden, Arkansas, with manuscript directive at lower left “Fav[or] M. A. Guynemere.” Sent from an officer in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry home to his wife, Rose. Uncanceled adversity use of demonetized U.S. envelope, which never passed through the mails, unknown date. Like all the other Arkansas regiments raised in the first wave of recruiting in 1861, the regiments were taken into Confederate armies east of the Mississippi River. Water staining which is likely a result of that hazardous journey across the river. Ex Matz and Clippert. $300.

Rowland B. Smith: Second Lieutenant enlisted in Co. I, 18th Arkansas Infantry (aka Carroll's Regiment), 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of the West. He quickly advanced to the rank of Major and became the commissary supply officer on staff of Cabell's Brigade. He later served on General Dockery's staff and was severely wounded at the Battle of Marks' Mill.” Much more information on the linked page.

$ 300

14849

SMUGGLED MAIL: CSA 12a, 10¢ milky blue (pre-use tear), tied by red ALEXANDRIA / LA. // FEB / 11 [1864] cds on folded letter datelined "Alexandria La. 11 Feby 1864" from George P. Evans to Col. S. F. Moseley, Jefferson Tex. The sender states "By the hands of Col. Gress of Dallas just from N.O. on parole I have recd a letter from Mr. Babcock dated 1st inst." Attached to this letter is a letter from Babcock to Moseley datelined "New Orleans Jany 8th 1864" which was smuggled out of the Union-occupied city to Alexandria La., concerning investing Confederate dollars in cotton. The February 11 letter mentions trying to find a reliable way to send money, minor mucilage stains where letters were joined together, expected splits along folds, a scarce TRANS-MISSISSIPPI  letter carried by courier and placed into the mails at Alexandria, ex Dr. Hubert Skinner. $1,400.

Sam. F. Moseley & Co., Attorneys at Law, General Land, Immigration and Collecting Agents, Jefferson, Texas. The Commercial Emporium of Northern and Eastern Texas and Adjacent Indian Territories, and Center of the Cotton and Grain Growing Portions of Texas [Jefferson, Texas, n.p., ca. 1866]. This is about all I could find on Moseley but a good jumping off point for more research, if you are so inclined.

$ 1,400

16381

SLAVE BILL OF SALE: 13 October 1857 stating, “This writing witnesses that for the consideration of three hundred and twenty five dollars to me this day paid by Elizabeth Bluford I have sold to her my Negro Woman Nelly and I hereby warrant the Leal title to said Nelly against the Claims of any and every person whatsoever. Witness my and & seal this 13th day of October 1857 (signed) Geo M. Bluford / Teste M. A. V. Downes.” 8 ¼” x 4 ½” clean, sound sheet. Plantation Collection. $250.

George Washington Bluford served in Company C, 54th Virginia Infantry, Army of Tennessee, also in Company D of the 1st Virginia Reserves. More information on the linked page.

$ 250

16384

Norfolk, Virginia, printed State Tax City of Norfolk Tax form dated 1846, including categories for “Slaves – 1 – at 32 cents each,” horses, gold watches, clocks, pianos and other forms of property. Made out to Mr. Geo. W. Bluford and signed Jas H. Ransome, SS, 5 ¾” x 4 ¼” file wear (document archival tape strengthening, and some holes, Plantation Collection. $40.

George Washington Bluford served in Company C, 54th Virginia Infantry, Army of Tennessee, also in Company D of the 1st Virginia Reserves. More information on the linked page.

$ 40

16452

ADAMS EX. CO. * LOUISVILLE, KY. * // JUL / 26 / 1861 beautifully struck cds on northbound cover to Miss Mary A. Comfort, Shiremanstown, Cumberland, County, Pa., originated somewhere in the South, franked with US 26, 3¢ dull red tied by blue grid with matching LOUISVILLE / KY. // JUL / 27 / 1861 double circle datestamp, cover reduced at right with side flap replaced and restoration along right side of cover under stamp which may not have originated on this cover, although the blue grid is that of Louisville. Very Fine appearing. CC Type AEN-1, CV $800. Special Routes Census No. N-AD-33 showing stamp replaced. $500.

$ 500

16453

ADAMS EX. CO. * LOUISVILLE, KY. * // AUG / 18 / 1861 nicely struck cds on northbound cover to Geo. W. Joneson, Esqr. Atty at Law, Buffalo, N.Y., originated somewhere in the South, franked with US 26, 3¢ dull red tied by blue grid with matching LOUISVILLE / KY. // AUG / 20 double circle datestamp, cover reduced bit at top with sealed tear through postmark. CC Type AEN-1, CV $800. Special Routes Census No. N-AD-74. $600.

$ 600

16454

ADAMS EX. CO. * LOUISVILLE, KY. * // JUL / 10 (inverted date) / 1861 clearly struck cds on northbound cover to L. C. Dewing, Care Dewing Thayer & Co, 784 Chambers St., New York, originated somewhere in the South, franked with US 26, 3¢ dull red straddle pane at right, tied by blue grid with matching LOUISVILLE / KY. // JUL / 11 double circle datestamp, cover reduced, manuscript “40/1” at top, reduced at right into express marking and large sealed tear extending from the bottom edge of cover up to express marking, Special Routes Census No. N-AD-15. $500.

$ 500

16510

Soldier’s letter with fancy stippling headed McPhersonville, So. Ca. August the 30th 1863 to Miss Louisa O. Whitmore and signed J.K. Lewis. Both spelling and grammar are a sometimes amusing challenge, e.g., “I haint no importante war nuse to communicate at present.” He states there are 30,000 troops in Charleston and “hope the Yankeys wont get Charleston…to right is all the satisfaction that wee have know and i low to make youse of it…” Charming 4 ½” x 6 ½” doubled side sheet with few small edge tears and bit of archival tape reinforcement. $300.

$ 300

16531

U27, 3¢ star-die entire used with “Central Academy [ Miss] / Feb 12 [1861]” manuscript cancel, addressed to Mr. R. H. Baker, Cypress P.O., Union Co., Ky.; sealed flap opening tears extending over top. Listed CSA Use with CSA Catalog Value of $300. Embossed Valentine enclosure with romantic verse on center wafer. $600.

Listed in both Miscellaneous-2 and Independent State Use-2

$ 600

16533

NORFOLK / VA // MAY / 27 / ’65 double circle datestamp with straightline DUE 6 on cover to Wm. S. Upshar, Norfolk, Va., and neat HELD FOR POSTAGE at left. Scarce immediate post-war use. $325.

$ 325

16539

SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID 2-line blue handstamp on cover with blue RICHMOND / TEX postmark and red PAID 10, addressed to T. F. Hagiligg (?), Mount Sterlin[g], Montgomery County, Ky., with blue LOUISVILLE / KY // JUN / 27 [1861] receiving mark and large perfectly struck matching DUE 3 handstamp; small repaired edge nick at right. Contents docketing on verso “Bestwick 1861.” Of the 30 covers recorded with SLU markings, only three are from Texas and each is from a different city. This is #SLU-27 on the Walse/Trepel census but the town of origin is not identified. 1963 PF certificate signed Louise Boyd Dale and 2016 PF certificate. Ex Semsrott and Haub. A real looker!  $19,000.

$ 15,000

16540

ADAMS EXPRESS / AUGUSTA: U27, 3¢ red entire with Adams Augusta May 21 [1861] blue oval used in conjunction with black ADAMS / NASHVILLE May 23 oval, addressed to Mrs. Alexander Cradit, Care Shirley & Cradit, Ithaca, Tompkins Co, N.Y., with manuscript directive at lower left “Express / GB” Express charge of “Paid 2/” (2 bits) at top center and New York duplex cancel; reduced at left and a few letter in the Nashville handstamp lightly pencil enhanced. Very Scarce and possibly unique combination of express office markings. 2016 PF certificate. Ex D. Scott Gallagher and Erivan Haub. $3,250.


Alexander M. Cradit (1821-1909) was married to Sarah (1827…); they had one daughter, Mary Marion Credit Calkins. In the 1870 census (Ithaca), he was listed as in the furniture business.

$ 3,250

11200

PRIZE COURT, Claim for Prize Money filed by NEGRO SAILOR Ruben Scott on August 21, 1865. Fabulous and scarce two-page document (back and front of one sheet) to which two U.S. 5¢ Internal Revenue stamps are affixed as well as official seals. Magenta pen notations on face that will be familiar to collectors of Prize Court covers. The document is affixed to an outer coversheet. According to the affidavit, Scott served on the U.S.S. Louisville as a Landsman 1863-65; Scott was a native of Virginia and enlisted at Grand Gulf on or about 1 August 1863. At the time of the claim he was living in Mound City, IL, employed as a Seaman. He is described as a Negro, 5’ 4 ½” tall with wool hair and black eyes. It does not specify which ship[s] were captured. Application was filed by Washington, D.C. attorney and claim advocate Wm. W. Danenhower. The U.S.S. Louisville was a 175 ft. city class IRONCLAD GUNBOAT. She served the Army’s Mississippi River Squadron. She assisted in the capture of Fort Donelson February 1862, the occupation of Columbus, KY and the capture of Island No. 10 and New Madrid, MO. She was ordered to Fort Pillow and participated in the Battle of Memphis and Vicksburg. She was decommissioned 21 July 1865 and sold at public auction at Mound City 29 November 1865. $400.

See April 2018 American Philatelist

$ 400

11204

PRIZE COURT, Claim for Prize Money filed by John Kelly, Seaman, U.S.S. Augusta, a 220 ft. side-wheel steamer. Scarce multi-page document to which two U.S. 5¢ Internal Revenue stamps are affixed as well as notary seal. Kelly certifies that he was aboard in 1861 when she captured the Cheshire and others. His certificate of discharge was 17 September 1862 in Philadelphia. He is listed as a native of New York, 32 years of age on 2 May 1864. Magenta pen notations on face that will be familiar to collectors of Prize Court covers. She served the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. $225.

See April 2018 American Philatelist

$ 225

11205

PRIZE COURT, Claim for Prize Money filed by Michael Brophy, U.S.S. Colorado. Wonderful large multi-page document dated 1 July 1865 to which three U.S. 10¢ Internal Revenue stamps (one hiding on the original document under a separate overlaid short document) is affixed as well as official seals. Magenta pen notations on face that will be familiar to collectors of Prize Court covers. According to the affavadit, Brophy served in 1862, 1863 and 1864 and captured the Winona and others. He is a resident of Boston, is 5’ 9”, light complesion, dark hair and grey eyes. The Colorado, a 3-masted steam frigate,  was struck six times by enemy fire as she served the Gulf Blockading Squadron. She carried 674 officers and men. $225. 


See April 2018 American Philatelist

$ 225

11206

PRIZE COURT, Claim for Prize Money filed by Herman Grubert, U.S.S. Shenandoah. Wonderful two-page document (back and front of one sheet) to which a U.S. 5¢ Internal Revenue stamp is affixed as well as official seals. According to the affavadit, Grubert was a Seaman who was a native of Prussia and enlisted at New York. He served on board the Shenandoah, a 225 ft. steam screw sloop with a compliment of 175 officers and men,  when she captured the Ella and others during 1863-64. Shenandoah was part of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. The claim was filed on 6 August 1869 by which time Grubert was a carpenter in New York. $200.
 

See April 2018 American Philatelist

$ 200

13564

Confederate Requisition for Stationery for 2nd Quarter 1864 issued April 15, 1864. Made out to Capt. Jas. F. Tompkins, Commanding Company A., 22nd  Virginia Battalion. He received three quires of foolscap paper and one blank book. $50.

$ 50

16005

CONFEDERATE NAVY: CSA 7-L, 5¢ blue vertical pair (pre-use crease tied bold WILMINGTON / N.C. // NOV / 30 [1864] cds on cover to Mr. Wm Rowzee, Salisbury, N.C., part of top back flap missing with opening tears extending over top edge of cover at left. Original letter from Wilmington NC Nov 29th 1864 from “C.W. Rowzee, Surgeon Steward CSA, Wilmington, NC” to parents saying that I am on duty for the present at the Naval Hospital…No furloughs given here…I am lucky enough in saving my life & getting good easy places but devilish unlucky in getting furlough.” NICE CONFEDERATE NAVY LETTER with full typed transcript and copy of Rowzee on microfiche roster.  $425.

Claudius W. Rowzee was a 25-year-old physician who served in Co. K, NC 8th Infantry. He served on the CSS Albemarle, captured again at Fort Fisher. Much more information on linked page.

$ 425

16549

US U26, 3¢ star-die cut square tied AUGUSTA / GA // JUL / 18 [1861] on piece with beautifully struck blue oval of ADAMS EXPRESS CO / AUGUSTA / GA // JUL 18 [1861] cds, as well as Confederate PAID 10 rate and 2/ (two bits) for the Express rate through the lines. A lovely piece with a 1989 CSA Certificate, Ex Stanley. Full cover catalogs $2,500 in CSA catalog. A bargain way to “fill the space.” $550.

$ 550

16550

US U27, 3¢ star-die cut square tied together on piece with US 26, 3¢ dull red, on small piece double rated with ADAMS EXPRESS CO / LOUISVILLE, KY / JUL /30 / 1861 cds; express agent’s double line circle PAID / J.W.R. and 25 uprated to 50 for double rate. A scarce piece with a 1985 CSA Certificate, Ex Stanley. Full cover would be in the thousands. $650.

$ 650

16766

THE WONDERLAND POSTAGE-STAMP CASE by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as LEWIS CARROLL, published by Emberlin & Son, 1890 (but after 1907) Folded card, reinforced by cloth, designed to hold and protect stamps of various sizes, third edition. The case is decorated with select illustrations of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by John Tenniel; the case can be flipped so that the baby Alice holds in one image transforms into a pig, and the Cheshire Cat disappears. This image features the postage-stamp case, its cover, and Carroll’s 39 page pamphlet Eight or Nine Wise Words About Letter Writing, published 1907. Printed pink matching envelope (worn) included, stamp case clean and bright.  A RARE AND SUPER COLLECTIBLE STAMP CASE AND PIECE OF CARROLLIANA. Very Fine.  See Kelleher's Collectors Connection, issue 8, for an article regarding these delightful stamp cases.

$ 500

16649

GREENSBOROUGH / N.C. red cds with ms. “Due 10” on soldier’s cover to Mrs. N. P. McAulay, Craighead PO, Mecklenburg, N, with endorsement of “Privet D. N. McAulay, Company C 37 Ret NCT” (North Carolina Troops). Two page letter to his mother, headed Camp Stokes October 29. He is horrified by the language used in camp, I have now been turned over to the 37th Regiment and expect to start for Richmond this night. I have heard such swearing since I have left home since I got married. We have loud praying and awful cursing with 15 steps of our tent at the same time, there can be no peace for such people, no, never, never. Just one week ago I left my own sweet home, I only stopped three nights. One night l on a sack or corn in the depot at Charlotte, then I came 110 miles to Greensboro, I have laid 3 nights in a tent and this night I expect to start for Richmond. The Lord only knows what will become of us! I remember now to ask all of you to remember me in your prayers for I may be shot. When the train got here a preacher came into the cars and passed through giving each man a nice little tract [religious pamphlet] to read. One wretched wicked man cursed him and told him to keep his wicked paper. When I see how wicked the some people are here I feel like…I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God then dwell in the tents of those wicked” Daniel N. McAuley.” Letters on linked page$280. 

Daniel N. McAuley mustered into "C" Co. NC 37th Infantry 10/25/1864. He died of disease on 2/22/1865 after serving in the Petersburg siege. CAMP STOKES near Greensboro, was initially a Confederate camp of instruction for conscripts and later as a prison for deserters 1864-1865. When the war ended, 200 Union prisoners were held here. Camp Stokes was commanded by Major Jesse R. McLean of Greensboro, N.C.

Listed in both Miscellaneous & North Carolina

$ 280

11391

Oath of Allegiance, State of Alabama, St. Clair County signed Enoch Machen 4th day November 1865 and signed by John A. Zellner, Judge of Probate. $200.

$ 200

13482b

SOLDIER’S LETTER: “The South has gained a great victory at Richmond…” Smyth Co. Va June 30th 1862 headed 2-page 8” x 10” letter on blue lined paper to “Dier brother” by O. N. Wolfe to Isaac W. Wolfe and (on same sheets) James D. Fletcher to Merry Wolfe in Stock Creek, Virginia. Letter (uneducated spelling and grammar) sent from Saltville, Va., saying in part, “I take the time to tell you about the grate victory the South gas gained at Richmond, they have taken 43 Genrals and forty two or three peares of cannons and a good many Colonels and Privates…if this is true I hope peace will be made before much longer as I am tirde of all of this plase…have been through the rivers and now are just on the side of the salt mill, direct letters to Saltville PO.” Mentions that he is eating well and is mending (wounded)… “If we never meate on earth may be meat in heaven…Poun Gap Battalion, Captain Haynes Company…James D. Fletcher (VA 21st Infantry). He refers to the battles of late around Richmond-Mechanicsville, First Cold Harbor, Gaines Mill-the Seven Days Battles. Excellent letter from North Carolina soldiers stationed or recuperating at Saltville. $550.


James Dykes Fletcher served in Co. C, Va 56th Infantry. He also served in Va 21st Batt. Infantry and Va 64th Infantry, Department of Western Virginia. More information on linked page.

$ 550

16373

Post Office Receipt for letters from Jackson, Mississippi, to Canton, Mississippi dated Dec 4, 186-, shows amount paid for stamps and money on that date, nice Jackson postmark usual spindle hole at center and bit of tape repair at upper back corners. C.H. Manship, P.M.; DOUBLED SIDED with other side crossed out and Manship spelled Monship Plantation Collection. $35.

$ 35

16389

Norfolk, Virginia, printed City Tax form dated June 24, 1863, including categories for “Male, $4,” and other forms of real estate and property. Made out to William Reid and John Davison Foster and signed G. W. Singleton, Collector, 8” x 4,” bit of foxing and wear, Plantation Collection. $30.

George Washington Bluford served in Company C, 54th Virginia Infantry, Army of Tennessee, also in Company D of the 1st Virginia Reserves. More information on the linked page.

$ 30

16460

Milledge Luke Bonham ALS, original copy of telegram dated Charleston [SC] July 17/ 64 3 ¾ p.m. to “My call for troops to fill your requisition nearly complete. It is telegraphed from Richmond that you by proclamation direct all person between 18 & 45 not in service to report to Camp of Instruction. My organization of the five thousand embraces most of these, shall I beat (?) up that if so I don’t think five thousand under fifty years of age can be obtained. M. L. Bonham.” On 8” x 10” in bold dark ink. $400.

$ 400

16488

CONFEDERATE STATES DEPOSITORY RECEIPT: 7 ¾” x 5 ½” lined ledger sheet headed “Depository of the Confederate States of America at Kinston S.C. Apl 25th 1864” signed by Edwd Porter stating that, “E. B. Newell, Postmaster at Johnsonville S.C. has this day deposited to the credit of the Confederate States Two Hundred and fifty Dollars on account of money received by him as Postmaster for the Post Office Department for the which I have signed receipt in Duplicate.” Nicely mounted on album page. $75.

$ 75

16509

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA SOLDIER’S LETTER headed “Bolliver Sept 28th, 1862.” This not long after the Battle of Bolivar Heights, 1862, where General Stonewall Jackson captured 12,500 Federal soldiers, the largest surrender of Union troops during the war. Unfortunately, first name is hard to read and last name not signed on the 7 ½” x 4 ½” 4-page letter to his mother. Well penned in dark ink. Mostly, he laments his war service and hopes he can stand the 3 years for which he signed up. “Since the last fight I feel more and more as if I would give anything if they would only settle this thing up and let us go home. I am sick of war and long to be among the quiet scenes of home once more…we have not been paid for a long time, they owe us for 5 months…we have to walk a mile to get water…Bolliver (sic) heights on a level piece of ground close to the village on one side is Loudon heights then across the river – Md height large all of them as mountains…all the boys don’t care how they settle the war if they only will settle it. We have all found it can’t be done by fight. We never can whip them.” $125.

$ 125

17009

STEAMER GENL. QUITMAN ultramarine oval handstamp tied on 3¢ star-die entire #U27 by cancel of a mail contract packet boat which operated on the Mississippi River. This 1861 use is from the well-known Carroll Hoy & Co., New Orleans correspondence. Rare use as Confederate Use of U.S. postal entire. Usual pin holes found on all this correspondence. Listed in the CSA catalog with a dash for value. $750

$ 750

17230

PRIZE COURT: Pendleton S.C. to Havana via Charleston, Prize Court Evidence. Folded 3-page letter in Spanish datelined "Pendleton 10 Setiembre 1861," blue "Pendleton S.C. Sep. 11" cds and matching PAID with manuscript "10," addressed to "Emilio Puig, Care of Spanish Consul, Charleston S.C.", carried on the blockade runner Nuestra Senora del Regla, which attempted to run the blockade from Charleston to Havana and was captured on December 1 near Port Royal; red New York Prize Court docketing at right with initials of Henry H. Elliott (New York Prize Court commissioner), some splits along folds, Very Fine and rare, mail on a captured blockade runner was useful in identifying contraband and was often introduced into evidence, CSA Catalog PC-01, CCV $3,500. Ex David Kohn, Dr. Howard Green, Steve Walske. $3,750.

See April 2018 American Philatelist

Emilio Puig was a resident of Charleston who is believed to have been engaged in running Cuban commodities into the South through the Union blockade. Much more information on linked page.

Listed in both the Miscellaneous and Blockade sections

$

17217

CSA 6, 5¢ light blue pair, tied by two strikes of "Southern Express Co. / Lynchburg / Va. / ? 16" double-circle datestamp on small commercially made cover to James P. Hawkins, Charlottesville Va. Hawkins was the Southern Express Co. agent at Charlottesville and endorsed "Kindness of Ex Messenger" indicating no express fee was charged; slightly reduced at right, Very Fine and RARE EXAMPLE OF THIS CONFEDERATE EXPRESS COMPANY MARKING FROM LYNCHBURG, ex Laurence and Sam Williams of Lynchburg, signed Bartels 1925, Molesworth signed this in 1967 saying the only one from Lynchburg he’d ever seen, with 1975 CSA certificate, CSA Catalog value $2,500. $2,000. James P. Hawkins worked as a messenger for Southern Express from at least 1862 to May 1865. General Orders No. 77, dated October 22, 1862, exempted Southern Express employees from conscription. He worked as an agent on the Virginia Central and the Orange & Alexandria railroads and wrote about his wartime work. His diaries are housed in Navarro College's Pearce Civil War Collection. Hawkins’ wartime express activity is available on historynet.com from a reprint of an article by Julie Holcomb in the May 2003 issue of America's Civil War.

$ 2,000

17245

Due 2” in pencil, addressed simply to “Genl J Simms” (General James P. Simms) on small folded letter (open for letter display) headed 29 June 1864. It reads, “Dear Genl, The party whom you may see has a written direction from C- saying that on application for the Negroes they will be provided or some such thing – let it be shown to You. [signed] Brown.” “Brown” was Georgia Governor Joseph Emerson Brown (signature matches known examples). Slight archival tape repairs on file splits and light soiling, durably inked. NICE USE TO / FROM KEY CONFEDERATE NOTABLES WITH SCARCE DROP RATE AND SLAVE CONTENT. $450. LL

General James Phillip Simms was a lawyer in Covington, Georgia, before and after the war. On December 8, 1864 Simms was promoted to brigadier general and given permanent command of his brigade. Much more information on linked page.

$ 450

10417

GENERAL HENRY WALTON WESSELS: (Union) COMMISSARY GENERAL OF PRISONERS. OFFICIAL BUSINESS. imprinted envelope with signature of “H. W. Wessels, Com. Genl. of Pris.” Washington, D.C., double-circle cancel, to “Mr. U. A. Denison, 187 4th St. Washington, D.C.,” docketing “Com. Gen. of Prisons,” slightly reduced at left. Scarce cover and signature.  $450.

Brig. Gen. Henry Walton Wessels was one of the officers that were placed under the fire of the Union batteries on Morris island, Charleston Harbor—known as the UNION 50. After he was exchanged he became commissary of prisoners. Much more information on linked page.

Listed in both POW-1 and Miscellaneous-2

$ 450

17583

LETTER: CSA 13, 20¢ green, tied neat RICHMOND / VA cds on overpaid cover to Edward W. Brown, Powhatan Court House, Virginia, with most interesting 2-page LETTER signed Mary S. Harwood, headed Richmond, August 25, 1864, letter file fold splits neatly repaired with archival tape. Writer requests Brown’s legal advice solicited by her mother regarding the sale of one of her servants (euphemism for slave), Harriett, because of her (bad) conduct. She wants to give the sale proceeds to the writer and her sister and does not want to buy any more servants, given the current political climate. She is wondering about the legalities of such a transaction and if it is necessary to inform the court of the sale or if she can dispose of the money as she wishes, with the securities being exempt. She declares the “servants” (slaves) are such “troublesome creatures.” Also says, We hear roar of cannon day & night, almost constantly. Last night about 2 O’clock we heard very rapid firing not withstanding it was dark & rainy, down toward Petersburg.” This was during the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, 1988 CSA certificate 01728 opining genuine overpayment of single letter rate, Ex P.W.W. Powell. SCV $1,250 just for a single rate use and no letter, back flap missing and small edge tears at top. $450.

Edward Smith Brown (1818-1908) came from good stock in every sense of the word, for his parents were more than ordinary people in a community of the highest social advantages until after the close of the Civil War. Very detailed bio on linked page.

Listed in both CSA 13 and Miscellaneous-2 LL

$ 450

17628

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI-EAST TO WEST: CSA 12-AD, 10¢ blue horizontal strip of 4, folded and partially separated at center, uncanceled on TRANS-MISSISSIPPI cover carried by military courier addressed to Co. Ben Allston, Genl. E. K. Smith’s Staff, Trans Mississippi (department headquarters) in Shreveport, La, with pencil docketing at left “Sept 17/64”, part of top back flap removed. Listed in Krieger census as E90 as “two pairs.” $1,000.

Benjamin Allston was an inspector general for General Kirby Smith  as well as chief of the secret service. Detailed bio on linked page.

$ 1,000

17629

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI-WEST TO EAST: CSA 13, 20¢ green, horizontal pair, manuscript canceled on cover to Mrs. Bettie Clay, Independence, Texas, with "Trans Mississippi" endorsement under postage, privately carried outside the postal system and entered the mails with HUNTSVILLE / TEX. // OCT / 26 cds; left stamp and several cover holes repaired but would benefit from a more professional job – cheap enough that substantial value would be added., 1978 CSA certificate. Sent from Capt. Tacitus T. Clay. Clay to his wife. Ex Telep. UNLISTED IN KRIEGER CENSUS. SCV $3,000. $600.

Capt. Tacitus Thomas Clay served in Co. I, 5th Texas (the Bloody Fifth). Lengthy detailed bio on linked page.

Listed in both Miscellaneous-2 and CSA 13

$ 600

14369a

Dietz Printing Co. elaborate flamboyant engraved stationery dated Mar. 18, 1911, to J. M. Bartels Co., New York handwritten announcement of the acquisition of “the magnificent collection of Mr. Franklin Stearns, consisting of Confederate locals and gen’l issues on cover, U.S. adhesives on and off cover, and Brit. Colonies…”  Colorful piece of philatelic history. A photo of Franklin Sterns Jr., (1848-1898) and August Dietz together among a dozen or so others is shown on the CSA website in front of Dietz’ office in 1898 http://www.csalliance.org/CSA/csa-1.htm  Sterns, Sr., was a leading Unionist in Richmond during the war, which earned him several trips to prison during the war. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_Stearns $55.

$ 55

17551

Dietz Essay, autographed card. Designed but never submitted, Prexie era. An identical one offered on eBay January 2016 as #200818665995 and described as “unique” with “Buy it Now” price of “only” $2,500. These are indeed scarce but hardly unique. My price “slightly” more reasonable at $150.

Listed in both Miscellaneous-2 and Proofs

$ 150

17485

CSA 11, 10¢ blue uncanceled on cover addressed to “Emile H. Reynés, Care of Amedee Guyol Esq., Augusta, Georgia.” This is a well-known correspondence of smuggled mail in and out of New Orleans by underground routes to evade the Federal Blockade. Old 1989 CSA certificate #02005 expressing “no opinion” on whether the envelope was handled by La. Relief Committee. Full explanation of why it is smuggled on linked page. The cover was delivered outside the mails by an unknown route. Ex-MacBride and Fisher. Rare! $650.  

$ 650

17923

GOVERNOR JOHN LETCHER AUTOGRAPH: RICHMOND / Va. // SEP / 25 / 1862 cds with matching straightline PAID and faint penciled “2” with manuscript “Ch[arge] Ex[ecutive] Depart[ment] of V[irgini]a J[ohn] L[etcher – Governor]” on fresh cover addressed in unmistakable bold hand of Governor John Letcher to Thomas H. Howard M.D. Genl Ransoms Brig. Hospital, Near Nine Mile Road three miles from “Richmond” Va. A super use with AUTOGRAPH VALUE as well as military address and scarce drop rate. $500.

Thomas H. Howard enlisted as an Assistant Surgeon in Field & Staff North Carolina 35th Infantry to take charge of brigade hospital at Front Royal, Va.

Listed in Miscellaneous-2 Virginia-3, and Imprints-1

$ 500

17861

MAJOR GENERAL JEREMY FRANCIS GILMER: Confederate States of America. War Department. Engineer Bureau, (WD-EN-01, CV $500) Three-line imprint at lower left of small blue cover (heavy watermark and embossing under top back flap “Manufactured by Waterlow & Sons, 65 to 68 London Wall, London.” Addressed to Brig. Gen. E. P. Alexander as "Chief of Artillery, Gen. Longstreet's Corps," SIGNATURE as [MAJOR GENERAL] "J. F. Gilmer Dec. 3rd 64 River Defense", Very Fine, military courier use as shown by manuscript directive at lower left to be delivered “By Capt. Goodwin.” (likely Archibald B. Goodwin of Va. 9th Infantry, Army Northern Virginia) MILITARY COURIER-DELIVERED BUSINESS LETTER FROM ONE CONFEDERATE GENERAL TO ANOTHER. GILMER AUTOGRAPH VALUE as well as scarce imprint and not one but two general officers. $700. 

Major General Jeremy Francis Gilmer was a soldier, mapmaker, and civil engineer most noted for his service as the Chief Engineer of the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. Brigadier General Edward Porter Alexander was a military engineer, railroad executive, planter, and author who was the officer in charge of the massive artillery bombardment preceding Pickett's Charge. Much more information on linked page.

Listed in both Imprints-2 and Miscellaneous-2

$ 700

17920

VIRGINIA GOVERNOR JOHN LETCHER: CSA 8, 2¢ brown red with large margins to in where separated unevenly prior to use, tied well-struck RICHMOND / VA. // FEB / 10 cds on cover locally addressed by Governor John Letcher to R. A. Brock, Esq. with State of Virginia, Executive Department imprint (S-VA-01, CV $500) at lower left, embossing under top back flap “Manufactured by Waterlow & Sons, 65 to 68 London Wall, London.” Very Fine. Ex Snead III. $1,000.

Robert Alonzo Brock donated an enormous collection of Civil War documents to the Huntingdon Library in San Marino, Ca. comprised of his own private and official correspondences. John Letcher is best known as Virginia’s Civil War-era governor. Much more information on linked page.

Listed in both Imprints-2 and Miscellaneous-2

$ 1,000

17925

IRGINIA GOVERNOR JOHN LETCHER: CSA 12-ADc, 10¢ bluish green (small faults) tied RICHMOND / VA. // DEC / 26 cds on cover addressed by Governor John Letcher to Mr. J. D. Davidson, Lexington, Rockbridge [County] Va. with State of Virginia, Executive Department imprint (S-VA-01, CV $500) at lower left of envelope which is addressed upside down thus placed it at upper right, embossing under top back flap “Manufactured by Waterlow & Sons, 65 to 68 London Wall, London.” On verso is a note by Letcher, “If you want to send me a telegram write to N. K. Fant, Mayor of S. ? to Despatch to you & I will get it. Letcher.” Ex Whittle. $350.

John Letcher is best known as Virginia’s Civil War-era governor. Much more information on linked page.

Listed in both Imprints-2 and Miscellaneous-2

$ 350

18176

Privately-Carried Cover (1864) from Richmond Va. to San Francisco; cover addressed to Mrs. Clara Crittenden in San Francisco in the hand of Confederate Captain James Love Crittenden, COVERTLY CARRIED OUT OF THE CONFEDERACY to the North. US 68, 10¢ green tied by blue BALTIMORE / MD. // JAN / 6 cds, SAN FRANCISCO "ADVERTISED" backstamp, original letter was sold as part of a group of Crittenden correspondence letters in Frajola Sale 2 as lot 52 and is now in the Clements Library, cover tears and stamp with small faults, ex Walske with his penciled notes on verso. Displays well. $550.

$ 550

18215

US 26, 3¢ dull red cancelled by grid on embossed Valentine cover to Miss Mag Cranford, Columbia, So Ca. with delightful ornate original Valentine enclosure “To Miss Mag” dated “Athens Ga 14th Feb 1861” and opening “O Idol of my dreams!” Top back flap missing and some back-flap adhesions of little consequence, 1980 PF Certificate. Rare Confederate State use of US postage on a Valentine, difficult to find covers and Valentines which truly belong together. A total charmer! $750.

$ 750

18274

US 26, 3¢ dull red, tied neat blue grid with matching double-circle datestamp of FRANKFORT / KY // FEB / 4 / 1861--THE DAY THE CONFEDERACY WAS FORMED on pristine cover. Kentucky did not secede until November 20, 1861; it was admitted into the Confederate States December 10, 1861. Cover addressed to John W. Blue, School Commissioner, Marion, Crittenden Co[unty] Ky., with embossed orange seal on the back flap with motto “United We Stand, Divided We Fall.” Cover opened through the seal and tear repaired with archival document tape. Historic FIRST DAY COVER. $850.

Kentucky initially tried to remain neutral, but it was much more complicated in practice than in principle. John William Blue, Sr. detailed biogrpahy on linked page.

$ 850

18280

CSA 7-L, 5¢ light blue pair tied CHARLOTTESVILLE / VA // JAN / 4 / 1863 dcds on small commercially-made cover, manuscript “By Courier Line & otherwise from Lynchburg.” To John W. Davis, Care of A. M. Smith, Engineer Corps, Wytheville, Wythe County, Va. RARE MANUSCRIPT DIRECTIVE routing the letter via military courier after arrival in Lynchburg. Wytheville was of strategic importance because of a nearby lead mines and the railroad that served it. This mine supplied lead for about one-third of the Confederate Army munitions. Ex Gimelson and Engstler. $350.

$ 350

18314

CENTREVILLE / TEN // JUN / 12 [1861] double strike of UNLISTED GREEN POSTMARK and manuscript “Paid” on 7-star flag patriotic (CSA Catalog 7-5A), to Governor [Isham] Harris, Nashville, Tenn. "Sold at Green & Co's. Book Store Nashville, Tenn." imprint, missing part of back flap, fresh and Very Fine and RARE UNLISTED INDEPENDENT STATE USE after the Confederate postal system had begun operations (Tennessee seceded on June 8 and was admitted to the Confederacy on July 2), Ex Gallagher and Kilbourne. $1,900.

$ 1,900

18352

New 4-15-19

CSA 7, 5¢ blue pair (tiny faults) tied beautifully struck SOUTHERN EXPRESS CO. / KNOXVILLE, TENN. // AUG / 3 double-circle datestamp (CSA catalog type E, CCV $2,500) , on cover to “Mrs. E. A. Jordan, Davisboro, Washington Co, Geo” with pencil manuscript ”Paid R E”, faint diagonal cover crease affecting right stamp and cover slightly reduced at right, fresh, SCARCE USE. 2012 PF certificate. $1,300.

The Southern Express Company was the largest private express company operating in the Confederacy. More detailed history on the linked page.

$ 1,300

18354

New 4-15-19

PRIZE COURT COVER presented as EVIDENCE OF A LEGAL SEIZURE OF A BLOCKADE-RUNNER. PENDLETON / S.C. // JUL / 22 [1861] with matching handstamped PAID 5, red manuscript court docket of “HHE” (Henry H. Elliot, the commissioner who initialed it as evidence in the case - CSA catalog PC-01, CCV $3,500). This was one of the early prize court cases of the Civil War. Addressed to the “Emilio Puig, Esq., Care of Spanish Consul, Charleston S.C.” It is one of the covers discovered in a false-bottom trunk. On 20 June 1863, a decree of restitution was ordered as the court ruled that the seizure had been without cause, Ex Birkinbine and Walske with his penciled notes on verso, Extremely Fine, 2012 PF certificate. $3,750.

Emilio Puig was a resident of Charleston who is believed to have been engaged in running Cuban commodities into the South through the Union blockade. More detailed history on the linked page.

Listed in both Miscellaneous-2 and Blockade sections

$ 3,750

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